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Lord Capulet

– The Typical Father Essay, Research Paper In Romeo and Juliet Lord Capulet, who expresses his fatherly love and concern for his only child Juliet, is a typical father. Like most fathers, Capulet adores his young and innocent daughter. He shows this when he says: “?My child is yet a stranger in the world – She hath not seen the change of fourteen years?” This means that she is not yet matured and is not ready to face the world of marriage.

– The Typical Father Essay, Research Paper

In Romeo and Juliet Lord Capulet, who expresses his fatherly love and concern for his only child Juliet, is a typical father. Like most fathers, Capulet adores his young and innocent daughter. He shows this when he says: “?My child is yet a stranger in the world – She hath not seen the change of fourteen years?” This means that she is not yet matured and is not ready to face the world of marriage. This adoration and pride in his daughter cause him to want the very best for his daughter, that is why he becomes angry when she disobeys him, that’s why in Act. 3 Scene 5 he says, “Disobedient wretch! I tell thee what. Get thee to church on Thursday or never after look me in the face.” It showed me that he becomes agitated when he knows Juliet is not doing what he feels is best for her. Even though Capulet loves his daughter, his self pride and hot temper sometimes frustrate him and cause him to make authoritarian decisions for his daughter. As often happens in parental – child relationships, Capulet becomes controlling. He says, “?go with Paris to Saint Peter’s Church or I will drag thee on a hurdle thither.” Showing that Capulet is short-tempered and will make threats if he feels it necessary. Capulet, like most fathers, justifies his reasoning and behavior by explaining what he has her best interest at heart. He shows this by saying, “Doth she not give us thanks? Is she not proud? Doth she not count her blest?” He is showing that he has tried to give her the best he could, yet she is still unsatisfied. He believes that he must get angry with her in order for her to straiten out. Although it is too late to show his devotion, Capulet, saddened by her death and no longer angry at her, shows his deep love and concern for his beloved Juliet when he realizes his mistake and says, “O, Brother Montague, give me thee hand. This is my daughter’s jointure, for no more can I demand.” He knows that Juliet wanted peace and he realized that making peace was the only thing that made sense. He saw how stupid this war was, and knew that no good could come from it.

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