Case Of Miranda V Arizona Essay Research

Case Of Miranda V. Arizona Essay, Research Paper The Supreme Court of the United States of America often makes decisions, which change this great nation in a great way. Often there is a disagreement over their decision: the court itself is often split. The impact of the Courts decision creates discussions and on occasion, violence.

Case Of Miranda V. Arizona Essay, Research Paper

The Supreme Court of the United States of America often makes decisions, which change this great nation in a great way. Often there is a disagreement over their decision: the court itself is often split. The impact of the Courts decision creates discussions and on occasion, violence. This is what happened in the case of Miranda v. Arizona in 1966, this case proven to be one of the most controversial cases in the history of this great nation and its people. This case changed history of this country and left a tremendous impact, which many tried to revisit and change in some way or another.

Ernest Miranda was born in 1940 in a little town Mesa, Arizona. His father had emigrated from Mexico and now was supporting the family of tree as a house painter. In 1946 Ernest Miranda lost his mother. His mother’s death seemed to mark the end of the happy childhood and the beginning of the troubled youth (”Miranda v. Arizona” 14). It was in the elementary school were Mr. Miranda a chose his way, his discipline was not acceptable his attendance record shows more absences then days present. He was able to finish the 8th grade but his latter education was stopped by his growing criminal activities his first serious arrest was for car theft, he was convicted and received probation (”Miranda v. Arizona” 14). From then on his criminal record growth to inorams size, it shows that he was arrested and convicted for crime such as burglary for which he was convicted and sends to State Industrial School for Boys at Fort Grant. Only a month after his release he arrested and charged with attempted rape and assault. He was found guilty and returned to Fort Grand in January 1957 Miranda was released from Fort Grant two month latter he was arrested in California for curfew violations and Peeping Tom activities five month after hi was arrested for armed robbery. He was released because the state did not have enough evidence to convict him (”Miranda v. Arizona” 14). During Miranda life he tried many times to start over and start a new life as an obedient citizen. He joined the army but was undesirably discharged. Again his criminal activities entered his life. In 1959 hi was arrested and convicted of auto theft and was sentenced up to a year in federal prison in Ohio later he was transferred to Lompoc, California which was closer to home. He was released in January 1961(”Miranda v. Arizona” 14). Next two years in his life Miranda life were spend in some what calm and normal way he moved in with Twaila Hoffman and her children however his criminal past followed him in March 1963 he was arrested and charged with kidnapping and rape.

Lois Ann Jameson (not her real name) took a bus to Seventh and Marlette streets. She stepped of the bus few minutes past mid night and began walking toward her home on Citrus Way. Suddenly a car pulled out of the driveway blocking the sidewalk. The driver got out and pushed Jameson in, then after tying her hands and ankles the men drove out toward a deserted area. He told the women to take her cloth off and then raped her allowed her to get dressed and took her back to the neigborhood where he had previously kidnapped her. Two police officers Cooley and Young arrived at the seine and as the result of the short investigation Miranda came out to be their suspect. After checking Miranda lengthy criminal record Cooley and Young arrived to the Miranda house. There they asked him to come with them to the station for a discussion on the case that they were investigating. At the police station Miranda was placed in the line up, and Lois Ann Jameson identified him. She also asked him if she could hear him speak. The detectives told Miranda that he was identified and began questioning him as the result he confessed to the rape. Then the detectives brought Lois Ann Jameson to the room so she could hear his voice after he was clearly identified as the rapist he was taken Phoenix jail where he was booked in the charges of kidnapping and rape (”Miranda v. Arizona” 14).

Miranda was appointed an attorney by the name of Alvin Moor. His main strategy was to prove that Miranda was insane. Court appointed two psychiatrists who came to a almost identical conclusion that Miranda was not insane and could tell the difference between right and wrong (”Miranda v. Arizona”18-19). After this strategy failed Moore did not attempted to pull of a miracle have some surprise witnesses he basically was challenged the use of the confession and the way that was use to receive it from Miranda.

As a result of this case Miranda was found guilty and sentenced to 20 to 30 years in prison.

Moore strongly believed that his client did not receive a fair trial and that the most incriminating evidence his confession should not have been admitted as evidence (”Miranda v. Arizona” 14). Therefor he appealed Miranda’s conviction to the Arizona Supreme Court this action proved to be unsuccessful. As Justice McFarland of the Arizona Supreme Court put it “Defendant had a record which indicates that he was not without court-room experience? he was certainly not unfamiliar with legal proceedings and the right in the court? police testified that they had informed that defendants of his rights” (”Miranda v. Arizona” 24).

The next step for Miranda and his lawyer was to appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court. Miranda like many other convicted prisoners heard of Clarence Gideon, who had appealed his conviction in forma paureris (in the form of a pauper)(”Miranda v. Arizona” 26). Miranda appealed to the U. S. Supreme Court but was rejected because of the minor mistakes in the paper work. Unknown to Miranda American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) captured the attention of his case. Robert Corcoran was in charge he contacted Miranda attorney and informed him that they had a good chance in the U. S. Supreme Court. At the same time he learned that Mr. Moore was not interested in this case do to his health. Corcoran found two lawyers who took this case to the court; they were John J. Flynn and John P. Frank.

It took almost a year for the case finally to be seen by the Supreme Court but on the other case it gave the attorneys to prepare for the half an hour of oral presentation in which thy had to present the case and also defend it.