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Jackie Robinson 2 Essay Research Paper On

Jackie Robinson 2 Essay, Research Paper On April 10th 1947 Jackie Robinson made history by becoming the first black player in the baseball modern major leagues. Jackie Robinson paved the way for many blacks, by helping to end to segregation in a segment of society. Branch Rickey chose Jackie to be the first, because of his character.

Jackie Robinson 2 Essay, Research Paper

On April 10th 1947 Jackie Robinson made history by becoming the first black player in the baseball modern major leagues. Jackie Robinson paved the way for many blacks, by helping to end to segregation in a segment of society. Branch Rickey chose Jackie to be the first, because of his character. Through part his life, Jackie developed the necessary skills needed, to become the first black player in the modern major leagues, to be a big part in the civil rights movement, and to help put an end to segregation and discrimination.

Jackie Robinson was born on January 31, 1919 in Cairo, Georgia. His father left him and his family when he was young, and his mother was left to raise all six children alone. His mother moved them to Pasadena, California when he was young. Jackie’s mother came from a family of fourteen children, and her grandparents were slaves. Jackie wasn’t very academic, but he exelled in sports. When Jackie was young he started a gang called the Pepper street gang. The gang would do things that blacks and other minorities were prohibited from doing. Robinson was arrested many times, and singled out by the police. When Jackie was growing up, he looked up to his brother Mack who was also a great athlete. Mack was part of the 1936 Olympic team, and finished second to Jesse Owens in the 200-meter dash in Berlin. In Junior college Jackie played football, baseball, and basketball. Jackie went on to UCLA, where he received a full athletic scholarship. At UCLA Jackie played football, baseball, basketball, and track. Jackie was also one of the only black to attended UCLA, as well as the first to play all four sports. For financial reasons Jackie took a job in Hawaii, which did not last long. A month later he was drafted to the army. Robinson refused to sit with the rest of the colors on his bus, and he was charged with a court martial. Jackie fought it and after three years in the army, he received an honorable discharge. After the army he went on to play baseball in the Negro leagues, on a team called the Kansas City Monarchs. There Jackie fought for players rights, and helped get increases for players salaries, and played great ball. Just one year later on August 8, 1945, he signed a contract with the Brooklyn Dodgers becoming the first African-American in that century to be placed under a playing contracts to a major league baseball team. Branch Rickey made it clear to Jackie then, that besides his athletic ability he was also chosen for his courage and communication skills. On February 10th 1946 Jackie married his college sweetheart Rachel. Robinson also started playing for the Dodger minor league team, the Montreal Royals. During many of the games Jackie was insulted and called names and some teams refused to play on the same field with him. Unlike other cities, the people of Montreal treated him very well. That year Jackie won the leagues most valuable player (MVP). On April 10th 1947 Jackie Robinson became the first black player in the modern major league baseball, by stepping on to the field with the Brooklyn Dodgers. Jackie had a great baseball career with the Dodgers winning Rookie of the year, many MVP’s, and playing in many All Star games. Jackie Robinson had to put up, alot of racism, but in the end he helped make baseball a game for both whites and black’s.

Jackie was a great baseball player for the Brooklyn Dodgers, but he is remembered as helping to end segregation in baseball. Every game Jackie played in, he was called names, and faced racism. Sometimes, Jackie would not be able to stay at the same hotel as the rest of the players on his team, or eat at the same restaurants. He was a role model for many blacks, every black child wanted to grow up to play second base for the Brooklyn Dodgers, because Robinson did. Robinson spoke out against Communism, and the New York Times wrote on July 18, 1949 “4 for 4 in hitting out against discrimination” . In 1949 he started talking back to opposing players, empires, racist comments, proving he was no longer afraid of discrimination. Even the press praised Jackie, for talking back against communism. ” Robinson was simply the most widely admired figure among African-Americans in memory”. Many other players followed Jackie, and only two years after he started playing baseball in the Major Leagues two other black players were signed. During Jackie’s final season in baseball, he was diagnosed with having diabetes. Although Jackie was a diabetic he would not let any of the players on his team know about his disease, until he could no longer hide it. Jackie retired from baseball in 1956, before the Brooklyn Dodgers were moved to LA. By 1959 segregation in baseball no longer existed, and Jackie’s mission was complete. At the time of his retirement, Jackie and Mrs. Robinson were the most publicized black couple in America. Although Jackie was known for his great achievement in baseball, there was life for Jackie after baseball. He was on the cover of such magazines as Time, and even stared in a movie called “The Jackie Robinson Story”. He was also the first baseball player to have a U.S postage stamp issued in his honor, in 1982.

After Jackie left baseball his first job was managing a company called ” Chock Full O’ Nuts”. Jackie was part of the brotherhood organization, which helped children. Jackie was also very involved in politics, and backed Nixon in the presidential elections. Which he later regretted, since Nixon refused to support Martin Luther King. Jackie became highly involved in civil rights and convinced more blacks to vote in the elections. Robinson donated a “five figured some” to the NAACP, and organization which he later became chairman of. The NAACP was a black organization, which fought for civil rights. Robinson also ran drives, to help raise money for schools, and children. Robinson spoke at packed churches with Dr King at his side. Once Malcolm X took over black civil rights, Jackie was pushed aside. So Rockefeller went into politics once again, and stood behind Rockefeller’s campaign Robinson’s support for Rockefeller ended quickly, when he announced his intention to support President Johnson in the upcoming election. Robinson would do whatever he had to help fight for civil rights, while endorsing Nike shoes he would say “Oh, bye the way lets do something about race”. In 1964 Jackie helped start a freedom national bank in Harlem, for the black people. He was also one of Rockefeller’s first black employees, and helped more get hired. In 1959 Jackie was hired to write a column for the New York Times, 3 times a week, as well a having a radio show once a week. Jackie past away on October 21, 1972 at the age of 53. In 1981 UCLA renamed their baseball field in honor of him, and he was inducted in to the baseball hall of fame in 1962, his first eligible year. In 1986 Jackie received the Medal of Freedom, the highest award a civilian can ever receive. President Bush praised him for constantly fighting to put an end to segregation, and to make sure all Americans received equal rights.

Through Jackie life, he fought to help put an end to segregation. Through his childhood Jackie developed the necessary skills to fights discrimination, and to be the first black to play in the modern major leagues. Jackie didn’t stop after helping to end segregation in baseball, he continued to fight discrimination in society. He became a vital asset to the civil rights movement. Jackie will always be remembered as the first black player in the modern major leagues, but most importantly as the man who helped to end segregation in society.

On April 10th 1947 Jackie Robinson made history by becoming the first black player in the baseball modern major leagues. Jackie Robinson paved the way for many blacks, by helping to end to segregation in a segment of society. Branch Rickey chose Jackie to be the first, because of his character. Through part his life, Jackie developed the necessary skills needed, to become the first black player in the modern major leagues, to be a big part in the civil rights movement, and to help put an end to segregation and discrimination.

Jackie Robinson was born on January 31, 1919 in Cairo, Georgia. His father left him and his family when he was young, and his mother was left to raise all six children alone. His mother moved them to Pasadena, California when he was young. Jackie’s mother came from a family of fourteen children, and her grandparents were slaves. Jackie wasn’t very academic, but he exelled in sports. When Jackie was young he started a gang called the Pepper street gang. The gang would do things that blacks and other minorities were prohibited from doing. Robinson was arrested many times, and singled out by the police. When Jackie was growing up, he looked up to his brother Mack who was also a great athlete. Mack was part of the 1936 Olympic team, and finished second to Jesse Owens in the 200-meter dash in Berlin. In Junior college Jackie played football, baseball, and basketball. Jackie went on to UCLA, where he received a full athletic scholarship. At UCLA Jackie played football, baseball, basketball, and track. Jackie was also one of the only black to attended UCLA, as well as the first to play all four sports. For financial reasons Jackie took a job in Hawaii, which did not last long. A month later he was drafted to the army. Robinson refused to sit with the rest of the colors on his bus, and he was charged with a court martial. Jackie fought it and after three years in the army, he received an honorable discharge. After the army he went on to play baseball in the Negro leagues, on a team called the Kansas City Monarchs. There Jackie fought for players rights, and helped get increases for players salaries, and played great ball. Just one year later on August 8, 1945, he signed a contract with the Brooklyn Dodgers becoming the first African-American in that century to be placed under a playing contracts to a major league baseball team. Branch Rickey made it clear to Jackie then, that besides his athletic ability he was also chosen for his courage and communication skills. On February 10th 1946 Jackie married his college sweetheart Rachel. Robinson also started playing for the Dodger minor league team, the Montreal Royals. During many of the games Jackie was insulted and called names and some teams refused to play on the same field with him. Unlike other cities, the people of Montreal treated him very well. That year Jackie won the leagues most valuable player (MVP). On April 10th 1947 Jackie Robinson became the first black player in the modern major league baseball, by stepping on to the field with the Brooklyn Dodgers. Jackie had a great baseball career with the Dodgers winning Rookie of the year, many MVP’s, and playing in many All Star games. Jackie Robinson had to put up, alot of racism, but in the end he helped make baseball a game for both whites and black’s.

Jackie was a great baseball player for the Brooklyn Dodgers, but he is remembered as helping to end segregation in baseball. Every game Jackie played in, he was called names, and faced racism. Sometimes, Jackie would not be able to stay at the same hotel as the rest of the players on his team, or eat at the same restaurants. He was a role model for many blacks, every black child wanted to grow up to play second base for the Brooklyn Dodgers, because Robinson did. Robinson spoke out against Communism, and the New York Times wrote on July 18, 1949 “4 for 4 in hitting out against discrimination” . In 1949 he started talking back to opposing players, empires, racist comments, proving he was no longer afraid of discrimination. Even the press praised Jackie, for talking back against communism. ” Robinson was simply the most widely admired figure among African-Americans in memory”. Many other players followed Jackie, and only two years after he started playing baseball in the Major Leagues two other black players were signed. During Jackie’s final season in baseball, he was diagnosed with having diabetes. Although Jackie was a diabetic he would not let any of the players on his team know about his disease, until he could no longer hide it. Jackie retired from baseball in 1956, before the Brooklyn Dodgers were moved to LA. By 1959 segregation in baseball no longer existed, and Jackie’s mission was complete. At the time of his retirement, Jackie and Mrs. Robinson were the most publicized black couple in America. Although Jackie was known for his great achievement in baseball, there was life for Jackie after baseball. He was on the cover of such magazines as Time, and even stared in a movie called “The Jackie Robinson Story”. He was also the first baseball player to have a U.S postage stamp issued in his honor, in 1982.

After Jackie left baseball his first job was managing a company called ” Chock Full O’ Nuts”. Jackie was part of the brotherhood organization, which helped children. Jackie was also very involved in politics, and backed Nixon in the presidential elections. Which he later regretted, since Nixon refused to support Martin Luther King. Jackie became highly involved in civil rights and convinced more blacks to vote in the elections. Robinson donated a “five figured some” to the NAACP, and organization which he later became chairman of. The NAACP was a black organization, which fought for civil rights. Robinson also ran drives, to help raise money for schools, and children. Robinson spoke at packed churches with Dr King at his side. Once Malcolm X took over black civil rights, Jackie was pushed aside. So Rockefeller went into politics once again, and stood behind Rockefeller’s campaign Robinson’s support for Rockefeller ended quickly, when he announced his intention to support President Johnson in the upcoming election. Robinson would do whatever he had to help fight for civil rights, while endorsing Nike shoes he would say “Oh, bye the way lets do something about race”. In 1964 Jackie helped start a freedom national bank in Harlem, for the black people. He was also one of Rockefeller’s first black employees, and helped more get hired. In 1959 Jackie was hired to write a column for the New York Times, 3 times a week, as well a having a radio show once a week. Jackie past away on October 21, 1972 at the age of 53. In 1981 UCLA renamed their baseball field in honor of him, and he was inducted in to the baseball hall of fame in 1962, his first eligible year. In 1986 Jackie received the Medal of Freedom, the highest award a civilian can ever receive. President Bush praised him for constantly fighting to put an end to segregation, and to make sure all Americans received equal rights.

Through Jackie life, he fought to help put an end to segregation. Through his childhood Jackie developed the necessary skills to fights discrimination, and to be the first black to play in the modern major leagues. Jackie didn’t stop after helping to end segregation in baseball, he continued to fight discrimination in society. He became a vital asset to the civil rights movement. Jackie will always be remembered as the first black player in the modern major leagues, but most importantly as the man who helped to end segregation in society.

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