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Drummer Essay Research Paper

Drummer Essay, Research Paper “Drummer” is a story about a boy who is trying to be normal in a society full of people who like big, strong, athletic people. The people are looked at as flawless, or else they can’t anything wrong. Billy is the exact opposite of what the community accepts. We are very sympathetic toward Billy in Vanderhaghe’s “Drummer” because he lives in the shadow of his older brother Gene, Billy’s dad won’t let him do what he wants, and he takes the blame for getting Nancy home late when it was actually Genes fault.

Drummer Essay, Research Paper

“Drummer” is a story about a boy who is trying to be normal in a society full of people who like big, strong, athletic people. The people are looked at as flawless, or else they can’t anything wrong. Billy is the exact opposite of what the community accepts. We are very sympathetic toward Billy in Vanderhaghe’s “Drummer” because he lives in the shadow of his older brother Gene, Billy’s dad won’t let him do what he wants, and he takes the blame for getting Nancy home late when it was actually Genes fault.

The main reason we feel sympathetic for Billy is his brother, Gene. Billy lives in the shadow of his brother. Gene is the most popular boy in school, the best athlete in the town, and the girls love him. Although Billy has good morals, takes responsibility, and is the more educated son, Gene is “God” in the eyes of the town. “Shit, last year they passed the hat around to all the big shots on the recreation board and collected the dough for one of Gene’s liquor fines and give it to him on the q.t.” (Vanderhaeghe, p.591). Gene went out on a date with a girl on a date on a bet. Gene lied to her to get her to go out with him. “What I do, Billy,” he told me once, “is make myself believe, say… well an H-bomb went off, or that some kind of disease which only attacks women wiped out every female on the face of the earth but the one I’m talking to. That makes her the last piece of tail on the face of the earth, Billy! It’s just natural then to be extra nice.” (Vanderhaeghe p.593). Gene and Billy went out on a double date. Billy went on the date because he wanted to see Gene get turned down by his date. Not only did Gene get this girl to go out him by lying, he left his date for Billy’s date. We feel sympathy for Billy in this situation cause he went on the date to see Gene get rejected and Gene “scored” twice and Billy’s plan to see him get rejected blew up in his face. We are very sympathetic for Billy because he lives in the shadow of Gene.

We feel sympathetic for Billy because of the way he is treated by his father. His dad just criticizes him for everything he does, good or bad. When his dad found out that he was going to Baptist Church, his dad was as mad as a bat out hell. “Baptists! Baptists! I’m having your head examined. Do you here me? I’m having it examined! Just keep it up and see if I don’t, you crazy little pecker. They roll in the aisles, Baptists, for chrissakes!”(Vanderhaghe p.589). Gene got in less trouble for crashing his dad’s car than Billy did for going to church. Even Billy and Gene’s dad favors Gene over Billy. “Shut your mouth. Don’t go dragging your brother into this. Anyway what he done to the car was accidental. But not you. Oh no, you marched into that collection of religious screwballs, holy belly-floppers, and linoleum-beaters under your own steam. On purpose. For God’s sake, Billy, that’s no religion that – it’s exercise. Stay away from them Baptists.” (Vanderhaghe p.590). Gene can crash a car and still go out, but Billy can’t leave the house on Sundays, let alone go to church. “You aren’t setting foot outside of that door of a Sunday anymore,”(Vanderhaghe p.591). Billy’s dad doesn’t let him do anything he wants and that is why we are sympathetic toward him.

We are also sympathetic for Billy when he takes the blame for the bad night. Billy goes to the door to get the girls and gets the third degree from Nancy’s, Gene’s date, parents and Gene just sits in the car and waits. In this story we are given the impression that Billy like Nancy, and when Gene takes off with Billy’s date she tells Billy how much she liked Gene. “I never even thought he knew I was alive. Never guessed. And here I was, crazy about him. Just crazy. I’d watch him in the hallway, you know? I traded lockers with Susan Braithwaite just to get closer to his. I went to all the hockey games to see him play. I worshipped him.” (Vanderhaghe p.599). Nancy still calls herself Gene’s date even though Billy kept her company, took her home, and gave her his scarf and mitts. “Then I try to kiss her. She sort of straight-arms me. I get the palm of my own glove in the face.

“What are you doing?” She sounds mad.

“Well you know—”

“I’m not your date,” she says real offended. “I’m your brother’s date.”(Vanderhaghe p.601). We feel the most sympathetic when this happens because we as readers realize that Billy can’t win.

We feel sympathy for Billy in “Drummer” because he lives in the shadow of Gene, his father won’t let Billy do what he want, and he took the blame for Gene the whole night. Billy is never going to get out shadows if he keeps trying to beat Gene. Billy needs to be more like Nancy who doesn’t care what others think, just be yourselfand hope for the best.

Work Cited

Baker, Sheridan. & Gamache, Lawrence B.(1998). The Canadian Practical Stylist. , Don Mills, Ontario: Addison-Wesley Longman Ltd.

Katz, Wendy R. Mackinnon, Kenneth A. Perkyns, Richard J.H. Thomas, Gilian. (1995). Introduction To Literature. (3rd edition, p.589-602). Toronto, Ontario: Harquart Brace & Company, Canada.

“Drummer” is a story about a boy who is trying to be normal in a society full of people who like big, strong, athletic people. The people are looked at as flawless, or else they can’t anything wrong. Billy is the exact opposite of what the community accepts. We are very sympathetic toward Billy in Vanderhaghe’s “Drummer” because he lives in the shadow of his older brother Gene, Billy’s dad won’t let him do what he wants, and he takes the blame for getting Nancy home late when it was actually Genes fault.

The main reason we feel sympathetic for Billy is his brother, Gene. Billy lives in the shadow of his brother. Gene is the most popular boy in school, the best athlete in the town, and the girls love him. Although Billy has good morals, takes responsibility, and is the more educated son, Gene is “God” in the eyes of the town. “Shit, last year they passed the hat around to all the big shots on the recreation board and collected the dough for one of Gene’s liquor fines and give it to him on the q.t.” (Vanderhaeghe, p.591). Gene went out on a date with a girl on a date on a bet. Gene lied to her to get her to go out with him. “What I do, Billy,” he told me once, “is make myself believe, say… well an H-bomb went off, or that some kind of disease which only attacks women wiped out every female on the face of the earth but the one I’m talking to. That makes her the last piece of tail on the face of the earth, Billy! It’s just natural then to be extra nice.” (Vanderhaeghe p.593). Gene and Billy went out on a double date. Billy went on the date because he wanted to see Gene get turned down by his date. Not only did Gene get this girl to go out him by lying, he left his date for Billy’s date. We feel sympathy for Billy in this situation cause he went on the date to see Gene get rejected and Gene “scored” twice and Billy’s plan to see him get rejected blew up in his face. We are very sympathetic for Billy because he lives in the shadow of Gene.

We feel sympathetic for Billy because of the way he is treated by his father. His dad just criticizes him for everything he does, good or bad. When his dad found out that he was going to Baptist Church, his dad was as mad as a bat out hell. “Baptists! Baptists! I’m having your head examined. Do you here me? I’m having it examined! Just keep it up and see if I don’t, you crazy little pecker. They roll in the aisles, Baptists, for chrissakes!”(Vanderhaghe p.589). Gene got in less trouble for crashing his dad’s car than Billy did for going to church. Even Billy and Gene’s dad favors Gene over Billy. “Shut your mouth. Don’t go dragging your brother into this. Anyway what he done to the car was accidental. But not you. Oh no, you marched into that collection of religious screwballs, holy belly-floppers, and linoleum-beaters under your own steam. On purpose. For God’s sake, Billy, that’s no religion that – it’s exercise. Stay away from them Baptists.” (Vanderhaghe p.590). Gene can crash a car and still go out, but Billy can’t leave the house on Sundays, let alone go to church. “You aren’t setting foot outside of that door of a Sunday anymore,”(Vanderhaghe p.591). Billy’s dad doesn’t let him do anything he wants and that is why we are sympathetic toward him.

We are also sympathetic for Billy when he takes the blame for the bad night. Billy goes to the door to get the girls and gets the third degree from Nancy’s, Gene’s date, parents and Gene just sits in the car and waits. In this story we are given the impression that Billy like Nancy, and when Gene takes off with Billy’s date she tells Billy how much she liked Gene. “I never even thought he knew I was alive. Never guessed. And here I was, crazy about him. Just crazy. I’d watch him in the hallway, you know? I traded lockers with Susan Braithwaite just to get closer to his. I went to all the hockey games to see him play. I worshipped him.” (Vanderhaghe p.599). Nancy still calls herself Gene’s date even though Billy kept her company, took her home, and gave her his scarf and mitts. “Then I try to kiss her. She sort of straight-arms me. I get the palm of my own glove in the face.

“What are you doing?” She sounds mad.

“Well you know—”

“I’m not your date,” she says real offended. “I’m your brother’s date.”(Vanderhaghe p.601). We feel the most sympathetic when this happens because we as readers realize that Billy can’t win.

We feel sympathy for Billy in “Drummer” because he lives in the shadow of Gene, his father won’t let Billy do what he want, and he took the blame for Gene the whole night. Billy is never going to get out shadows if he keeps trying to beat Gene. Billy needs to be more like Nancy who doesn’t care what others think, just be yourselfand hope for the best.

Work Cited

Baker, Sheridan. & Gamache, Lawrence B.(1998). The Canadian Practical Stylist. , Don Mills, Ontario: Addison-Wesley Longman Ltd.

Katz, Wendy R. Mackinnon, Kenneth A. Perkyns, Richard J.H. Thomas, Gilian. (1995). Introduction To Literature. (3rd edition, p.589-602). Toronto, Ontario: Harquart Brace & Company, Canada.

“Drummer” is a story about a boy who is trying to be normal in a society full of people who like big, strong, athletic people. The people are looked at as flawless, or else they can’t anything wrong. Billy is the exact opposite of what the community accepts. We are very sympathetic toward Billy in Vanderhaghe’s “Drummer” because he lives in the shadow of his older brother Gene, Billy’s dad won’t let him do what he wants, and he takes the blame for getting Nancy home late when it was actually Genes fault.

The main reason we feel sympathetic for Billy is his brother, Gene. Billy lives in the shadow of his brother. Gene is the most popular boy in school, the best athlete in the town, and the girls love him. Although Billy has good morals, takes responsibility, and is the more educated son, Gene is “God” in the eyes of the town. “Shit, last year they passed the hat around to all the big shots on the recreation board and collected the dough for one of Gene’s liquor fines and give it to him on the q.t.” (Vanderhaeghe, p.591). Gene went out on a date with a girl on a date on a bet. Gene lied to her to get her to go out with him. “What I do, Billy,” he told me once, “is make myself believe, say… well an H-bomb went off, or that some kind of disease which only attacks women wiped out every female on the face of the earth but the one I’m talking to. That makes her the last piece of tail on the face of the earth, Billy! It’s just natural then to be extra nice.” (Vanderhaeghe p.593). Gene and Billy went out on a double date. Billy went on the date because he wanted to see Gene get turned down by his date. Not only did Gene get this girl to go out him by lying, he left his date for Billy’s date. We feel sympathy for Billy in this situation cause he went on the date to see Gene get rejected and Gene “scored” twice and Billy’s plan to see him get rejected blew up in his face. We are very sympathetic for Billy because he lives in the shadow of Gene.

We feel sympathetic for Billy because of the way he is treated by his father. His dad just criticizes him for everything he does, good or bad. When his dad found out that he was going to Baptist Church, his dad was as mad as a bat out hell. “Baptists! Baptists! I’m having your head examined. Do you here me? I’m having it examined! Just keep it up and see if I don’t, you crazy little pecker. They roll in the aisles, Baptists, for chrissakes!”(Vanderhaghe p.589). Gene got in less trouble for crashing his dad’s car than Billy did for going to church. Even Billy and Gene’s dad favors Gene over Billy. “Shut your mouth. Don’t go dragging your brother into this. Anyway what he done to the car was accidental. But not you. Oh no, you marched into that collection of religious screwballs, holy belly-floppers, and linoleum-beaters under your own steam. On purpose. For God’s sake, Billy, that’s no religion that – it’s exercise. Stay away from them Baptists.” (Vanderhaghe p.590). Gene can crash a car and still go out, but Billy can’t leave the house on Sundays, let alone go to church. “You aren’t setting foot outside of that door of a Sunday anymore,”(Vanderhaghe p.591). Billy’s dad doesn’t let him do anything he wants and that is why we are sympathetic toward him.

We are also sympathetic for Billy when he takes the blame for the bad night. Billy goes to the door to get the girls and gets the third degree from Nancy’s, Gene’s date, parents and Gene just sits in the car and waits. In this story we are given the impression that Billy like Nancy, and when Gene takes off with Billy’s date she tells Billy how much she liked Gene. “I never even thought he knew I was alive. Never guessed. And here I was, crazy about him. Just crazy. I’d watch him in the hallway, you know? I traded lockers with Susan Braithwaite just to get closer to his. I went to all the hockey games to see him play. I worshipped him.” (Vanderhaghe p.599). Nancy still calls herself Gene’s date even though Billy kept her company, took her home, and gave her his scarf and mitts. “Then I try to kiss her. She sort of straight-arms me. I get the palm of my own glove in the face.

“What are you doing?” She sounds mad.

“Well you know—”

“I’m not your date,” she says real offended. “I’m your brother’s date.”(Vanderhaghe p.601). We feel the most sympathetic when this happens because we as readers realize that Billy can’t win.

We feel sympathy for Billy in “Drummer” because he lives in the shadow of Gene, his father won’t let Billy do what he want, and he took the blame for Gene the whole night. Billy is never going to get out shadows if he keeps trying to beat Gene. Billy needs to be more like Nancy who doesn’t care what others think, just be yourselfand hope for the best.

Work Cited

Baker, Sheridan. & Gamache, Lawrence B.(1998). The Canadian Practical Stylist. , Don Mills, Ontario: Addison-Wesley Longman Ltd.

Katz, Wendy R. Mackinnon, Kenneth A. Perkyns, Richard J.H. Thomas, Gilian. (1995). Introduction To Literature. (3rd edition, p.589-602). Toronto, Ontario: Harquart Brace & Company, Canada.

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