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Factors Affecting Health Care Administration Career Development

By Gender Differences Essay, Research Paper Analysis of Issues in the Health Care Industry Factors Affecting Health Care Administration Career Development

By Gender Differences Essay, Research Paper

Analysis of Issues in the Health Care Industry

Factors Affecting Health Care Administration Career Development

in Gender Differences

Introduction

Evaluating the research supporting this article involves thoughtful examination of

all aspects of the report. The purpose is to maintain an objective balance while

identifying both the pluses and minuses of the research. When weaknesses are identified,

they are evaluated to determine whether they represent minor issues or major

flaws(Soeken, 2000, p. 882-893). Following examination of both the strengths and

weaknesses, conclusion is made about the relevance of the study for clinical practice and

for further research (Anonymous, 2000, p. 326).

Discussion

Ruchika and Nitin (1998) examine gender differences in organizational and

individual factors that have been modeled as influences on career development. The

authors state the problem clearly and concisely in the opening lines of their article. For

effective research, the problem needs to be narrow enough to allow a focused study, that

is broad enough to remain relevant and significant. Their findings reveal that more than

one-half of the recent graduates of master?s health care administration programs are

women. However, this study determines that men earn an average of $61,491 per year

while women (with the same educational background) earn $50,839 (Criztens).

Monifa (2000) states, as a man pursuing a career in health care administration,

there many advantages. Even more significantly, the male network may provide access to

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mentors within the organization (Hirsch, 1999). Katzenbach (1999) research of managers

found that women frequently had less contact with their supervisors and lack corporate

mentors despite their participation in organizations, but these studies suggest that women

lack integration into the informal, but more significant, organization culture causing

averse career development.

Gender differences in organizational and individual factors that have been

modeled as influences on career development were evaluated (Sigel 1999). Crosby,

(1999) says these factors included financial and nonfinancial benefits, access to training

programs, indicators of success, demographics and motivations underlying education,

employment, and career choices.

Conclusion

Career development differs for male and female health care executives, however,

the distinctions appear to be influenced more by demographic and organizational variable

than by individual career motivations.

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REFERENCES

Anonymous (2000). Manufacturing management: Return of the stop watch.

Economist, 326. 69.

O?Beirne, K. (2000). Factors affecting health administration: Gender Difference.

Women?s International Network News, 25. 25-27.

Criztens, R. (1999). Racing to the top. Inc.,16, 46-47.

Crosby, C. B. (1999). Completeness quality for the 21st century. New

York: Penguin Books USA.

Hirsch, C. L. (1999). Still explicit gender discrimination.

Massachusetts: Human Resource Development Press.

Katzenbach, J. R. (1999). Real change leaders. New York: McKinsey

& Company.

Monifa, A. (2000). Race and gender matter in health care, Inc.,17, 8-32.

Ruchika, T. & Nitin, W., (2000). Hues: Shades of thought. New York:

McGraw-Hill, Inc.

Soeken, S. (2000). Critiquing research: Steps for complete evaluation of an

article. American Operating Room Nurse Journal, 41, 882-893.

Sigel, L. S., (1999). New careers in hospitals. New York: The Rosen

Publishing Group.

Bibliography

REFERENCES

Anonymous (2000). Manufacturing management: Return of the stop watch.

Economist, 326. 69.

O?Beirne, K. (2000). Factors affecting health administration: Gender Difference.

Women?s International Network News, 25. 25-27.

Criztens, R. (1999). Racing to the top. Inc.,16, 46-47.

Crosby, C. B. (1999). Completeness quality for the 21st century. New

York: Penguin Books USA.

Hirsch, C. L. (1999). Still explicit gender discrimination.

Massachusetts: Human Resource Development Press.

Katzenbach, J. R. (1999). Real change leaders. New York: McKinsey

& Company.

Monifa, A. (2000). Race and gender matter in health care, Inc.,17, 8-32.

Ruchika, T. & Nitin, W., (2000). Hues: Shades of thought. New York:

McGraw-Hill, Inc.

Soeken, S. (2000). Critiquing research: Steps for complete evaluation of an

article. American Operating Room Nurse Journal, 41, 882-893.

Sigel, L. S., (1999). New careers in hospitals. New York: The Rosen

Publishing Group.

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