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Field Project Essay Research Paper Newark Field

Field Project Essay, Research Paper Newark Field Project (1) The vast array of flashy shops and trendy restaurants, preceding the Newark Shopping Center, make up the second definite commercial landscape of East Main Street. The second landscape which includes a jamboree of barbershops, pizza kitchens, and flower boutiques begins close to the bike shop, which neighbors the outdated railroad tracks, and ends near the Main Street Galleria.

Field Project Essay, Research Paper

Newark Field Project

(1) The vast array of flashy shops and trendy restaurants, preceding the Newark Shopping Center, make up the second definite commercial landscape of East Main Street. The second landscape which includes a jamboree of barbershops, pizza kitchens, and flower boutiques begins close to the bike shop, which neighbors the outdated railroad tracks, and ends near the Main Street Galleria. This shopping area provides ease and sufficiency to the town of Newark by catering to every individuals needs.

The third commercial landscape that Main Street is home to, can be recognized towards the end of the street. Before the two lane road splits, a number of buildings can be seen that serve a different function. By remodeling and building, the University of Delaware has transformed this area into a functional part of the campus where students can meet with one another, hold activities, and get advisement on their route to their degree. The College of Arts and Science, the Trabant, and various other campus buildings can all be found in this area.

(2) Two medium sized brick houses lay side by side just east of the Vision Center of Newark. Although both look fairly weathered and aged, the one to the far left has been recently face lifted. Bright green window shutters and new doors were added to freshen up the look of this business office. The house in its entirety is still prominent, but its purpose today is different than that of many years ago. Besides a few home improvements, the house closer to the vision center has been left untouched. It, unlike the house on the right, does not seem to function as a business. The structure of both houses suggests that they were well suited for the colder parts of the year. A chimney to keep warm, a basement for lost of storage, and an attic accompany the two main floors.

(3) While walking down Main Street not many great architectural buildings catch the eye, but one that does is St. Johns R.C. Church. Its post-modern theme reflects that of many churches. Newark Bagels, although recently established, also represents a gothic theme. Its newly constructed New York City style structure has gargoyles watching you from above as you walk by. Lastly the newly furnished reading room attached to the student’s center, previously known as a church, shares a post-modern theme with St. Johns R.C. Church. Its stained glass and gothic appearance cast an illusion of an old European church.

(4) Although Klondike Kates appearance suggest that it is a newly constructed building which was made to look old, its history dates back to the beginning of Main Street. Previously used as a parts shop, gas station, roller rink, and post office, Klondike Kates has undergone tremendous change. Proceeding to the immediate left, while facing Klondike Kates, is the Good Will store. Although this structure is fully constructed in brick and sends off signals as being an original native to Main Street, its design does not fit that of Main Streets first arrivers. Next to the Good Will is a chain of small restaurants and businesses. While directly standing in front of these shops the eye can only see the flashy neon lights and remodeled interiors. But when a view is taken in from a distance, it can be seen that the array of shops is actually built upon old houses. The roofs and top floors of the shops in this area are old and unlike their first floor counter parts, they have not been treated to gain societies attention. On the other hand, The Happy Harry’s, once an original building, was recently torn down and built to compete with CVS down the road.

(5) The third definite landscape of Main Street, primarily owned by the university, is very separate from its neighboring buildings. The enormous students center and three-story concrete garage, stand tall almost as if they were two gigantic guards watching those who exit Main Street. On a small street, such as Main Street, these buildings are often welcome by the local youth. Large flashy buildings indicate change, and change in turn indicates the transition away from small town life.

In many ways downtown Newark is the University of Delaware. With out the university many shops, restaurants and other business agencies would not be able to support themselves. The university brings in youth, who bring in money and wealth to the surrounding area. To keep the youth coming, University of Delaware must keep up with their needs by providing and expanding constantly. The dilemma is that the students of today, just like most people, enjoy new things. New buildings, new computer labs, and new centers, keep the students enthusiastic and motivated. What does all this change do to a small town landscape? Change although slow to the eye, comes rapidly once one area is established. Main Street ten years from now may look entirely different. Slowly, just as it has been occurring, technology and growth will eat away at the native buildings of Main Street, and leave a vast pool of neon lights and trendy caf?s. In the end the only way to see the original Main Street landscape will be to put on virtual goggles and view it at the Cyber Caf? that is currently being developed on the street itself.

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Newark Field Project

(1) The vast array of flashy shops and trendy restaurants, preceding the Newark Shopping Center, make up the second definite commercial landscape of East Main Street. The second landscape which includes a jamboree of barbershops, pizza kitchens, and flower boutiques begins close to the bike shop, which neighbors the outdated railroad tracks, and ends near the Main Street Galleria. This shopping area provides ease and sufficiency to the town of Newark by catering to every individuals needs.

The third commercial landscape that Main Street is home to, can be recognized towards the end of the street. Before the two lane road splits, a number of buildings can be seen that serve a different function. By remodeling and building, the University of Delaware has transformed this area into a functional part of the campus where students can meet with one another, hold activities, and get advisement on their route to their degree. The College of Arts and Science, the Trabant, and various other campus buildings can all be found in this area.

(2) Two medium sized brick houses lay side by side just east of the Vision Center of Newark. Although both look fairly weathered and aged, the one to the far left has been recently face lifted. Bright green window shutters and new doors were added to freshen up the look of this business office. The house in its entirety is still prominent, but its purpose today is different than that of many years ago. Besides a few home improvements, the house closer to the vision center has been left untouched. It, unlike the house on the right, does not seem to function as a business. The structure of both houses suggests that they were well suited for the colder parts of the year. A chimney to keep warm, a basement for lost of storage, and an attic accompany the two main floors.

(3) While walking down Main Street not many great architectural buildings catch the eye, but one that does is St. Johns R.C. Church. Its post-modern theme reflects that of many churches. Newark Bagels, although recently established, also represents a gothic theme. Its newly constructed New York City style structure has gargoyles watching you from above as you walk by. Lastly the newly furnished reading room attached to the student’s center, previously known as a church, shares a post-modern theme with St. Johns R.C. Church. Its stained glass and gothic appearance cast an illusion of an old European church.

(4) Although Klondike Kates appearance suggest that it is a newly constructed building which was made to look old, its history dates back to the beginning of Main Street. Previously used as a parts shop, gas station, roller rink, and post office, Klondike Kates has undergone tremendous change. Proceeding to the immediate left, while facing Klondike Kates, is the Good Will store. Although this structure is fully constructed in brick and sends off signals as being an original native to Main Street, its design does not fit that of Main Streets first arrivers. Next to the Good Will is a chain of small restaurants and businesses. While directly standing in front of these shops the eye can only see the flashy neon lights and remodeled interiors. But when a view is taken in from a distance, it can be seen that the array of shops is actually built upon old houses. The roofs and top floors of the shops in this area are old and unlike their first floor counter parts, they have not been treated to gain societies attention. On the other hand, The Happy Harry’s, once an original building, was recently torn down and built to compete with CVS down the road.

(5) The third definite landscape of Main Street, primarily owned by the university, is very separate from its neighboring buildings. The enormous students center and three-story concrete garage, stand tall almost as if they were two gigantic guards watching those who exit Main Street. On a small street, such as Main Street, these buildings are often welcome by the local youth. Large flashy buildings indicate change, and change in turn indicates the transition away from small town life.

In many ways downtown Newark is the University of Delaware. With out the university many shops, restaurants and other business agencies would not be able to support themselves. The university brings in youth, who bring in money and wealth to the surrounding area. To keep the youth coming, University of Delaware must keep up with their needs by providing and expanding constantly. The dilemma is that the students of today, just like most people, enjoy new things. New buildings, new computer labs, and new centers, keep the students enthusiastic and motivated. What does all this change do to a small town landscape? Change although slow to the eye, comes rapidly once one area is established. Main Street ten years from now may look entirely different. Slowly, just as it has been occurring, technology and growth will eat away at the native buildings of Main Street, and leave a vast pool of neon lights and trendy caf?s. In the end the only way to see the original Main Street landscape will be to put on virtual goggles and view it at the Cyber Caf? that is currently being developed on the street itself.

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