Wisdom

– Confucius Essay, Research Paper World Lit. I. Wisdom Confucius said: ” The knowing enjoy water, the humane enjoy mountains. The knowing are diligent; the humane are quiet. The knowing are happy, the humane are long-lived.”(611) Water is vital to existence and is moving streaming and flowing away from the mountains, across all terrain.

– Confucius Essay, Research Paper

World Lit. I.

Wisdom

Confucius said: ” The knowing enjoy water, the humane enjoy mountains. The knowing are diligent; the humane are quiet. The knowing are happy, the humane are long-lived.”(611) Water is vital to existence and is moving streaming and flowing away from the mountains, across all terrain. Mountains, however majestic, remain stationary forever. To know and to know more one must move and learn. Knowledge also expands appetite for more knowledge therefore the ones who know, will diligently work to know more and to better the world instead of quietly accepting it. Happiness is measured in height, not in length; it is directly related to the degree of personal fulfillment that one is able to reach, which far outweighs the length of meaningless and empty life. The truth and wisdom of Confucius’ assertion is clearly reflected in Ashvagohosha’s “Buddhacarita”. In the passage the bright young princess is kept shielded from all negative aspects of life. Once he breaks the bubble and gets outside the palace, he realizes he had been kept from knowing life itself. He becomes even more curious, persistent and willing to act instead of accepting, and, finally, he sets out in search of happiness through spiritual enlightenment.

Water, although it could be momentarily and partially arrested, is impossible to confine. Just like young Shakyamuni, it cannot be held captive, it cannot be kept from going to places. It will eventually claim its space and demand its freedom:

The monarch, reflecting that the prince must see nothing untoward that might agitate his mind, assigned him a dwelling in the upper storeys of the palace and did not allow him to access the ground. . . . The hearing of the entrancing character of the city groves, beloved of the womenfolk, he set his heart on an expedition outside, like an elephant confined inside a house. (550)

As water moves away from the mountains, the prince begins his journey that will ultimately lead him away from the palace and propel him towards discovering the world for himself.

With each excursion his curiosity grows and each time be becomes more and more compelled to learn about the real world and to make a difference. The quote states, “The knowing are diligent; the humane are quiet.”(611) Prince Shakyamuni perfectly mirrors the transition between quietness and diligence as knowledge about the real world penetrates his boundaries:

Then the prince returned to the same palace, but so lost in anxiety that is seemed to him empty. But even there he found no relief, as he ever dwelt on the subject of old age; therefore once more with the permission of the king he went out?(553)

Although the things he learns about the real world do not strike him positively, learning itself inevitably induces a craving to learn more, which, ironically enough diminishes his understanding of the world:

Therefore, charioteer, let our chariot be turned back; for it is not the time or place for pleasure-resorts. For how could a man of intelligence be heedless here in the hour of calamity, when once he knows of destruction? (554)

Knowing and learning place him in a state of chaos, and only leave him with more questions. He becomes anxious and overwhelmed by the discovery of the real world. He finds the world to be ignorant, insensitive and displeasing, and he finds it impossible to think it to be acceptable in its current state:

He, the supreme man, saw that they had no firm footing in the real truth, and with mind that was at the same time both perturbed and steadfast he thus mediated:- ‘? what rational being would stand or sit or lie at ease, still less laugh, when he knows of old age, disease and death?. . . . he is just like a being without reason, who, on seeing another aged or ill or even dead, remains indifferent and unmoved. For when one tree is shorn both of its flowers and its fruit and falls or is cut down, another tree in no distressed thereby.’ . . . he felt no contentment, he obtained no relief, like a lion pierced deeply in the heart by a poisoned arrow. (555)

Contentment and quiet acceptance are the biggest obstacle to action. To do nothing brings no happiness to anyone; therefore anxiety and grief are essential in propelling the prince towards seeking personal fulfillment in this world. Although he realizes that some facts of life are indeed inevitable, he remains unable to simply accept the world as it is:

A wretched thing it is indeed that, who is himself helpless and subject to the law of old age, disease and destruction, should in his ignorance and the blindness of his conceit, pay no heed to another who is the victim of old age, disease or death. For if I, who am myself such, should pay no heed to another whose nature is equally such, it would not be right or fitting in me, who have knowledge of this, the ultimate laws.

He can never again quietly retreat to the undisturbed comfort, peace and luxury of the palace. In fact, his new experiences and insight into reality change his very definition of “comfort” and “peace” and he sets out to find happiness through spiritual fulfillment and leaves the palace.

In accordance with Confucius’ statement, the prince, like water, could not be held and confined indefinitely. Once on the move, he kept moving away from the palace, like the water with its stream irreversible. The more he knew, the more he wanted to know, and the less he understood. His quest for knowledge led him out of the quietness of the palace and his deep drive to seek answers and changes sent him off in pursuit of his happiness.

Judit Bodor

ENG. 2653

World Lit. I.

Wisdom

Confucius said: ” The knowing enjoy water, the humane enjoy mountains. The knowing are diligent; the humane are quiet. The knowing are happy, the humane are long-lived.”(611) Water is vital to existence and is moving streaming and flowing away from the mountains, across all terrain. Mountains, however majestic, remain stationary forever. To know and to know more one must move and learn. Knowledge also expands appetite for more knowledge therefore the ones who know, will diligently work to know more and to better the world instead of quietly accepting it. Happiness is measured in height, not in length; it is directly related to the degree of personal fulfillment that one is able to reach, which far outweighs the length of meaningless and empty life. The truth and wisdom of Confucius’ assertion is clearly reflected in Ashvagohosha’s “Buddhacarita”. In the passage the bright young princess is kept shielded from all negative aspects of life. Once he breaks the bubble and gets outside the palace, he realizes he had been kept from knowing life itself. He becomes even more curious, persistent and willing to act instead of accepting, and, finally, he sets out in search of happiness through spiritual enlightenment.

Water, although it could be momentarily and partially arrested, is impossible to confine. Just like young Shakyamuni, it cannot be held captive, it cannot be kept from going to places. It will eventually claim its space and demand its freedom:

The monarch, reflecting that the prince must see nothing untoward that might agitate his mind, assigned him a dwelling in the upper storeys of the palace and did not allow him to access the ground. . . . The hearing of the entrancing character of the city groves, beloved of the womenfolk, he set his heart on an expedition outside, like an elephant confined inside a house. (550)

As water moves away from the mountains, the prince begins his journey that will ultimately lead him away from the palace and propel him towards discovering the world for himself.

With each excursion his curiosity grows and each time be becomes more and more compelled to learn about the real world and to make a difference. The quote states, “The knowing are diligent; the humane are quiet.”(611) Prince Shakyamuni perfectly mirrors the transition between quietness and diligence as knowledge about the real world penetrates his boundaries:

Then the prince returned to the same palace, but so lost in anxiety that is seemed to him empty. But even there he found no relief, as he ever dwelt on the subject of old age; therefore once more with the permission of the king he went out?(553)

Although the things he learns about the real world do not strike him positively, learning itself inevitably induces a craving to learn more, which, ironically enough diminishes his understanding of the world:

Therefore, charioteer, let our chariot be turned back; for it is not the time or place for pleasure-resorts. For how could a man of intelligence be heedless here in the hour of calamity, when once he knows of destruction? (554)

Knowing and learning place him in a state of chaos, and only leave him with more questions. He becomes anxious and overwhelmed by the discovery of the real world. He finds the world to be ignorant, insensitive and displeasing, and he finds it impossible to think it to be acceptable in its current state:

He, the supreme man, saw that they had no firm footing in the real truth, and with mind that was at the same time both perturbed and steadfast he thus mediated:- ‘? what rational being would stand or sit or lie at ease, still less laugh, when he knows of old age, disease and death?. . . . he is just like a being without reason, who, on seeing another aged or ill or even dead, remains indifferent and unmoved. For when one tree is shorn both of its flowers and its fruit and falls or is cut down, another tree in no distressed thereby.’ . . . he felt no contentment, he obtained no relief, like a lion pierced deeply in the heart by a poisoned arrow. (555)

Contentment and quiet acceptance are the biggest obstacle to action. To do nothing brings no happiness to anyone; therefore anxiety and grief are essential in propelling the prince towards seeking personal fulfillment in this world. Although he realizes that some facts of life are indeed inevitable, he remains unable to simply accept the world as it is:

A wretched thing it is indeed that, who is himself helpless and subject to the law of old age, disease and destruction, should in his ignorance and the blindness of his conceit, pay no heed to another who is the victim of old age, disease or death. For if I, who am myself such, should pay no heed to another whose nature is equally such, it would not be right or fitting in me, who have knowledge of this, the ultimate laws.

He can never again quietly retreat to the undisturbed comfort, peace and luxury of the palace. In fact, his new experiences and insight into reality change his very definition of “comfort” and “peace” and he sets out to find happiness through spiritual fulfillment and leaves the palace.

In accordance with Confucius’ statement, the prince, like water, could not be held and confined indefinitely. Once on the move, he kept moving away from the palace, like the water with its stream irreversible. The more he knew, the more he wanted to know, and the less he understood. His quest for knowledge led him out of the quietness of the palace and his deep drive to seek answers and changes sent him off in pursuit of his happiness.

Judit Bodor

ENG. 2653

World Lit. I.

Wisdom

Confucius said: ” The knowing enjoy water, the humane enjoy mountains. The knowing are diligent; the humane are quiet. The knowing are happy, the humane are long-lived.”(611) Water is vital to existence and is moving streaming and flowing away from the mountains, across all terrain. Mountains, however majestic, remain stationary forever. To know and to know more one must move and learn. Knowledge also expands appetite for more knowledge therefore the ones who know, will diligently work to know more and to better the world instead of quietly accepting it. Happiness is measured in height, not in length; it is directly related to the degree of personal fulfillment that one is able to reach, which far outweighs the length of meaningless and empty life. The truth and wisdom of Confucius’ assertion is clearly reflected in Ashvagohosha’s “Buddhacarita”. In the passage the bright young princess is kept shielded from all negative aspects of life. Once he breaks the bubble and gets outside the palace, he realizes he had been kept from knowing life itself. He becomes even more curious, persistent and willing to act instead of accepting, and, finally, he sets out in search of happiness through spiritual enlightenment.

Water, although it could be momentarily and partially arrested, is impossible to confine. Just like young Shakyamuni, it cannot be held captive, it cannot be kept from going to places. It will eventually claim its space and demand its freedom:

The monarch, reflecting that the prince must see nothing untoward that might agitate his mind, assigned him a dwelling in the upper storeys of the palace and did not allow him to access the ground. . . . The hearing of the entrancing character of the city groves, beloved of the womenfolk, he set his heart on an expedition outside, like an elephant confined inside a house. (550)

As water moves away from the mountains, the prince begins his journey that will ultimately lead him away from the palace and propel him towards discovering the world for himself.

With each excursion his curiosity grows and each time be becomes more and more compelled to learn about the real world and to make a difference. The quote states, “The knowing are diligent; the humane are quiet.”(611) Prince Shakyamuni perfectly mirrors the transition between quietness and diligence as knowledge about the real world penetrates his boundaries:

Then the prince returned to the same palace, but so lost in anxiety that is seemed to him empty. But even there he found no relief, as he ever dwelt on the subject of old age; therefore once more with the permission of the king he went out?(553)

Although the things he learns about the real world do not strike him positively, learning itself inevitably induces a craving to learn more, which, ironically enough diminishes his understanding of the world:

Therefore, charioteer, let our chariot be turned back; for it is not the time or place for pleasure-resorts. For how could a man of intelligence be heedless here in the hour of calamity, when once he knows of destruction? (554)

Knowing and learning place him in a state of chaos, and only leave him with more questions. He becomes anxious and overwhelmed by the discovery of the real world. He finds the world to be ignorant, insensitive and displeasing, and he finds it impossible to think it to be acceptable in its current state:

He, the supreme man, saw that they had no firm footing in the real truth, and with mind that was at the same time both perturbed and steadfast he thus mediated:- ‘? what rational being would stand or sit or lie at ease, still less laugh, when he knows of old age, disease and death?. . . . he is just like a being without reason, who, on seeing another aged or ill or even dead, remains indifferent and unmoved. For when one tree is shorn both of its flowers and its fruit and falls or is cut down, another tree in no distressed thereby.’ . . . he felt no contentment, he obtained no relief, like a lion pierced deeply in the heart by a poisoned arrow. (555)

Contentment and quiet acceptance are the biggest obstacle to action. To do nothing brings no happiness to anyone; therefore anxiety and grief are essential in propelling the prince towards seeking personal fulfillment in this world. Although he realizes that some facts of life are indeed inevitable, he remains unable to simply accept the world as it is:

A wretched thing it is indeed that, who is himself helpless and subject to the law of old age, disease and destruction, should in his ignorance and the blindness of his conceit, pay no heed to another who is the victim of old age, disease or death. For if I, who am myself such, should pay no heed to another whose nature is equally such, it would not be right or fitting in me, who have knowledge of this, the ultimate laws.

He can never again quietly retreat to the undisturbed comfort, peace and luxury of the palace. In fact, his new experiences and insight into reality change his very definition of “comfort” and “peace” and he sets out to find happiness through spiritual fulfillment and leaves the palace.

In accordance with Confucius’ statement, the prince, like water, could not be held and confined indefinitely. Once on the move, he kept moving away from the palace, like the water with its stream irreversible. The more he knew, the more he wanted to know, and the less he understood. His quest for knowledge led him out of the quietness of the palace and his deep drive to seek answers and changes sent him off in pursuit of his happiness.

Judit Bodor

ENG. 2653

World Lit. I.

Wisdom

Confucius said: ” The knowing enjoy water, the humane enjoy mountains. The knowing are diligent; the humane are quiet. The knowing are happy, the humane are long-lived.”(611) Water is vital to existence and is moving streaming and flowing away from the mountains, across all terrain. Mountains, however majestic, remain stationary forever. To know and to know more one must move and learn. Knowledge also expands appetite for more knowledge therefore the ones who know, will diligently work to know more and to better the world instead of quietly accepting it. Happiness is measured in height, not in length; it is directly related to the degree of personal fulfillment that one is able to reach, which far outweighs the length of meaningless and empty life. The truth and wisdom of Confucius’ assertion is clearly reflected in Ashvagohosha’s “Buddhacarita”. In the passage the bright young princess is kept shielded from all negative aspects of life. Once he breaks the bubble and gets outside the palace, he realizes he had been kept from knowing life itself. He becomes even more curious, persistent and willing to act instead of accepting, and, finally, he sets out in search of happiness through spiritual enlightenment.

Water, although it could be momentarily and partially arrested, is impossible to confine. Just like young Shakyamuni, it cannot be held captive, it cannot be kept from going to places. It will eventually claim its space and demand its freedom:

The monarch, reflecting that the prince must see nothing untoward that might agitate his mind, assigned him a dwelling in the upper storeys of the palace and did not allow him to access the ground. . . . The hearing of the entrancing character of the city groves, beloved of the womenfolk, he set his heart on an expedition outside, like an elephant confined inside a house. (550)

As water moves away from the mountains, the prince begins his journey that will ultimately lead him away from the palace and propel him towards discovering the world for himself.

With each excursion his curiosity grows and each time be becomes more and more compelled to learn about the real world and to make a difference. The quote states, “The knowing are diligent; the humane are quiet.”(611) Prince Shakyamuni perfectly mirrors the transition between quietness and diligence as knowledge about the real world penetrates his boundaries:

Then the prince returned to the same palace, but so lost in anxiety that is seemed to him empty. But even there he found no relief, as he ever dwelt on the subject of old age; therefore once more with the permission of the king he went out?(553)

Although the things he learns about the real world do not strike him positively, learning itself inevitably induces a craving to learn more, which, ironically enough diminishes his understanding of the world:

Therefore, charioteer, let our chariot be turned back; for it is not the time or place for pleasure-resorts. For how could a man of intelligence be heedless here in the hour of calamity, when once he knows of destruction? (554)

Knowing and learning place him in a state of chaos, and only leave him with more questions. He becomes anxious and overwhelmed by the discovery of the real world. He finds the world to be ignorant, insensitive and displeasing, and he finds it impossible to think it to be acceptable in its current state:

He, the supreme man, saw that they had no firm footing in the real truth, and with mind that was at the same time both perturbed and steadfast he thus mediated:- ‘? what rational being would stand or sit or lie at ease, still less laugh, when he knows of old age, disease and death?. . . . he is just like a being without reason, who, on seeing another aged or ill or even dead, remains indifferent and unmoved. For when one tree is shorn both of its flowers and its fruit and falls or is cut down, another tree in no distressed thereby.’ . . . he felt no contentment, he obtained no relief, like a lion pierced deeply in the heart by a poisoned arrow. (555)

Contentment and quiet acceptance are the biggest obstacle to action. To do nothing brings no happiness to anyone; therefore anxiety and grief are essential in propelling the prince towards seeking personal fulfillment in this world. Although he realizes that some facts of life are indeed inevitable, he remains unable to simply accept the world as it is:

A wretched thing it is indeed that, who is himself helpless and subject to the law of old age, disease and destruction, should in his ignorance and the blindness of his conceit, pay no heed to another who is the victim of old age, disease or death. For if I, who am myself such, should pay no heed to another whose nature is equally such, it would not be right or fitting in me, who have knowledge of this, the ultimate laws.

He can never again quietly retreat to the undisturbed comfort, peace and luxury of the palace. In fact, his new experiences and insight into reality change his very definition of “comfort” and “peace” and he sets out to find happiness through spiritual fulfillment and leaves the palace.

In accordance with Confucius’ statement, the prince, like water, could not be held and confined indefinitely. Once on the move, he kept moving away from the palace, like the water with its stream irreversible. The more he knew, the more he wanted to know, and the less he understood. His quest for knowledge led him out of the quietness of the palace and his deep drive to seek answers and changes sent him off in pursuit of his happiness.

Judit Bodor

ENG. 2653

World Lit. I.

Wisdom

Confucius said: ” The knowing enjoy water, the humane enjoy mountains. The knowing are diligent; the humane are quiet. The knowing are happy, the humane are long-lived.”(611) Water is vital to existence and is moving streaming and flowing away from the mountains, across all terrain. Mountains, however majestic, remain stationary forever. To know and to know more one must move and learn. Knowledge also expands appetite for more knowledge therefore the ones who know, will diligently work to know more and to better the world instead of quietly accepting it. Happiness is measured in height, not in length; it is directly related to the degree of personal fulfillment that one is able to reach, which far outweighs the length of meaningless and empty life. The truth and wisdom of Confucius’ assertion is clearly reflected in Ashvagohosha’s “Buddhacarita”. In the passage the bright young princess is kept shielded from all negative aspects of life. Once he breaks the bubble and gets outside the palace, he realizes he had been kept from knowing life itself. He becomes even more curious, persistent and willing to act instead of accepting, and, finally, he sets out in search of happiness through spiritual enlightenment.

Water, although it could be momentarily and partially arrested, is impossible to confine. Just like young Shakyamuni, it cannot be held captive, it cannot be kept from going to places. It will eventually claim its space and demand its freedom:

The monarch, reflecting that the prince must see nothing untoward that might agitate his mind, assigned him a dwelling in the upper storeys of the palace and did not allow him to access the ground. . . . The hearing of the entrancing character of the city groves, beloved of the womenfolk, he set his heart on an expedition outside, like an elephant confined inside a house. (550)

As water moves away from the mountains, the prince begins his journey that will ultimately lead him away from the palace and propel him towards discovering the world for himself.

With each excursion his curiosity grows and each time be becomes more and more compelled to learn about the real world and to make a difference. The quote states, “The knowing are diligent; the humane are quiet.”(611) Prince Shakyamuni perfectly mirrors the transition between quietness and diligence as knowledge about the real world penetrates his boundaries:

Then the prince returned to the same palace, but so lost in anxiety that is seemed to him empty. But even there he found no relief, as he ever dwelt on the subject of old age; therefore once more with the permission of the king he went out?(553)

Although the things he learns about the real world do not strike him positively, learning itself inevitably induces a craving to learn more, which, ironically enough diminishes his understanding of the world:

Therefore, charioteer, let our chariot be turned back; for it is not the time or place for pleasure-resorts. For how could a man of intelligence be heedless here in the hour of calamity, when once he knows of destruction? (554)

Knowing and learning place him in a state of chaos, and only leave him with more questions. He becomes anxious and overwhelmed by the discovery of the real world. He finds the world to be ignorant, insensitive and displeasing, and he finds it impossible to think it to be acceptable in its current state:

He, the supreme man, saw that they had no firm footing in the real truth, and with mind that was at the same time both perturbed and steadfast he thus mediated:- ‘? what rational being would stand or sit or lie at ease, still less laugh, when he knows of old age, disease and death?. . . . he is just like a being without reason, who, on seeing another aged or ill or even dead, remains indifferent and unmoved. For when one tree is shorn both of its flowers and its fruit and falls or is cut down, another tree in no distressed thereby.’ . . . he felt no contentment, he obtained no relief, like a lion pierced deeply in the heart by a poisoned arrow. (555)

Contentment and quiet acceptance are the biggest obstacle to action. To do nothing brings no happiness to anyone; therefore anxiety and grief are essential in propelling the prince towards seeking personal fulfillment in this world. Although he realizes that some facts of life are indeed inevitable, he remains unable to simply accept the world as it is:

A wretched thing it is indeed that, who is himself helpless and subject to the law of old age, disease and destruction, should in his ignorance and the blindness of his conceit, pay no heed to another who is the victim of old age, disease or death. For if I, who am myself such, should pay no heed to another whose nature is equally such, it would not be right or fitting in me, who have knowledge of this, the ultimate laws.

He can never again quietly retreat to the undisturbed comfort, peace and luxury of the palace. In fact, his new experiences and insight into reality change his very definition of “comfort” and “peace” and he sets out to find happiness through spiritual fulfillment and leaves the palace.

In accordance with Confucius’ statement, the prince, like water, could not be held and confined indefinitely. Once on the move, he kept moving away from the palace, like the water with its stream irreversible. The more he knew, the more he wanted to know, and the less he understood. His quest for knowledge led him out of the quietness of the palace and his deep drive to seek answers and changes sent him off in pursuit of his happiness.

Judit Bodor

ENG. 2653

World Lit. I.

Wisdom

Confucius said: ” The knowing enjoy water, the humane enjoy mountains. The knowing are diligent; the humane are quiet. The knowing are happy, the humane are long-lived.”(611) Water is vital to existence and is moving streaming and flowing away from the mountains, across all terrain. Mountains, however majestic, remain stationary forever. To know and to know more one must move and learn. Knowledge also expands appetite for more knowledge therefore the ones who know, will diligently work to know more and to better the world instead of quietly accepting it. Happiness is measured in height, not in length; it is directly related to the degree of personal fulfillment that one is able to reach, which far outweighs the length of meaningless and empty life. The truth and wisdom of Confucius’ assertion is clearly reflected in Ashvagohosha’s “Buddhacarita”. In the passage the bright young princess is kept shielded from all negative aspects of life. Once he breaks the bubble and gets outside the palace, he realizes he had been kept from knowing life itself. He becomes even more curious, persistent and willing to act instead of accepting, and, finally, he sets out in search of happiness through spiritual enlightenment.

Water, although it could be momentarily and partially arrested, is impossible to confin

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