Compare And Contrast Of Emily Essay Research

Compare And Contrast Of Emily Essay, Research Paper Emily Dickinson s A Bird Came Down the Walk– and I Dreaded that First Robin So, compare and contrast in a number of significant ways. Both works incorporate the theme of nature, juxtaposed with pain imagery. A strong tone in both poems helps to carry out the speaker s message.

Compare And Contrast Of Emily Essay, Research Paper

Emily Dickinson s A Bird Came Down the Walk– and I Dreaded that First Robin So, compare and contrast in a number of significant ways. Both works incorporate the theme of nature, juxtaposed with pain imagery. A strong tone in both poems helps to carry out the speaker s message. The figurative language helps support the theme of nature.

Nature is exquisitely beautiful, but it also has a dark side to it. In A Bird Came Down the Walk– , depicts a bird biting an Angleworm in halves/ And ate the fellow, raw and drank the Dew. In I Dreaded that First Robin So, depicts a Robin Woods, Daffodils, Grass, Blossom, and Bees. Both poems begin with a bird and pain imagery; bit an Angleworm, in A Bird Came Down the Walk– , and He hurts a little, though– in I Dreaded that First Robin So, . In A Bird Came Down the Walk– , the final stanza achieves a beautiful image of a butterfly rowing its wings threw the sky, as if it were swimming without splashes. Dickinson creates a naturalistic and wonderful feel toward nature. In I Dreaded that First Robin So, in the final stanza, the diction changes from the hurt and pain, to the acceptance of her pain, Lift, in bereaved acknowledgment. The speaker provides a summary of what will happen every year as she watches this exquisite nature bloom before her eyes, No Blossom stayed away. Both poems develop the theme of nature as exquisite beauty, but also with a sense of pain to it.

Dickinson manipulates the tone in both poems. In A Bird Came Down the Walk– , the speaker achieves an objective point of view throughout the first three stanzas. The descriptions are clear, A Bird came down the Walk– through To let a Beetle pass– . Again, more of objective tone, He glance with rapid eyes through He stirred his Velvet Head . In I Dreaded that First Robin So, it is different. The tone starts off I dreaded that first Robin, so as a fearful imagery of the robin. Also a painful tone in the last line of the first stanza, He hurts a little, though– . In A Bird came down the Walk– , a change of tone from the transition to third and fourth stanza He stirred his Velvet Head/ Like one in danger, Cautious, . In I Dreaded that First Robin So, the tone magnifies more with resentment (because of the pain) in the fifth stanza, I could not bear the Bees should come, / I wished they d stay away/ In those dim countries where they go, A clear evidence of the tone increased is the capitalization of Bees. This affects the speaker, deeply, and shows it through her diction and gradual increase pain in the tone. Both poems are similar in that they both have a change of tone.

Figurative language promotes the theme of nature in both poems. In A Bird Came Down the Walk– , nature imagery in the last two stanzas includes poetic metaphors, And he unrolled his feathers/ And rowed him softer home. Dickinson provides one of the most breath-taking descriptions of flying in all of poetry, Or Butterflies, off Banks of Noon/ Leap, plashless as they swim. The diction in these two lines is vital in creating a wonderful image to nature. Simply by offering two quick comparisons of flight with aquatic motion (rowing and swimming), she evokes a sense of delicacy and fluidity of moving through the air. In I Dreaded that First Robin So, the reader later finds out why she is suffering from nature in the second to last stanza. The speaker views herself as The Queen of Calvary, a place just outside the walls of Jerusalem where Jesus was crucified. The constant reminder of spring with daffodils or robins gives her pain because it is a constant reminder that Jesus was crucified. Both poems establish a beautiful sense of nature. Dickinson makes the transition to nature by using metaphors in both poems.

Emily Dickinson s A Bird Came Down the Walk– and I Dreaded that First Robin So, are different and similar in many ways. Both poems dominate the theme of nature and its beauty along with pain imagery. Emily Dickinson uses tone to influence the theme of nature. Figurative language uses itself as a tool to beautify and simplify the complexity of nature. Emily Dickinson s wonderful writing style beautifies nature.