The Great Divorce Essay Research Paper In

The Great Divorce Essay, Research Paper In The Great Divorce, C. S. Lewis uses autobiographical allusions in order to aid the reader in a better understanding of his conversion to Christianity. Throughout the entire novel, each character represents Lewis’ previous notions of Christ and Christianity (Alfred 1), and the people that aided in his understanding of Christ.

The Great Divorce Essay, Research Paper

In The Great Divorce, C. S. Lewis uses autobiographical allusions in order to aid the reader in a better understanding of his conversion to Christianity. Throughout the entire novel, each character represents Lewis’ previous notions of Christ and Christianity (Alfred 1), and the people that aided in his understanding of Christ. It is an amazing thing to use one’s past to create a canvas of characters that display ideas and mindsets.

To understand why it is significant that C. S. Lewis became a Christian, it may be needed to briefly explain his background. Lewis was born into a house that was not outspoken as a Christian one. Even though his family attended church occasionally, Lewis became an atheist. He could not bring himself to the conclusion that a greater power could care for him. After being schooled at fine schools including Oxford University, Lewis became a professor of Medieval Arts. Sometime afterwards, some of Lewis’ friends, including J. R. R. Tolkien, persuaded Lewis of a loving and faithful God. After his slow conversion, Lewis used his fine literary skills to continue his role as an educator and author.

The phantoms that are alluded to (described?) in The Great Divorce are literary representations of Lewis’ previous beliefs, feelings, and notions. The Episcopal Phantom, as the fifth chapter describes is talented and religious, as was Lewis, according to his autobiography, Surprised By Joy. This phantom, although seemingly well educated, does not realize that where he has been is Hell. No matter how many times that his earthly apprentice tries to persuade him that where he is actually is a “Holiday from Hell” (Hooper 279), the phantom repeats that he feels that he is not needed this Heaven, which bares a resemblance to Lewis’ early struggles with Christianity.

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> 1) At lunch time, sit in your parked car and point a hair dryer at

passing

> > cars to see if they slow down.

> > 2) Page yourself over the intercom. (Don’t disguise your voice.)

> > 3) Insist that your e mail address is:

> > Xena-goddess-of-fire@companyname.com

> > or Elvis-the-King@companyname.com.

> > 4) Every time someone asks you to do something, ask if they want fries with that.

> > 5) Encourage your colleagues to join you in a little synchronized chair dancing.

> > 6) Put your garbage can on your desk and label it “IN.”

> > 7) Develop an unnatural fear of staplers.

> > 8) Put decaf in the coffee maker for 3 weeks. Once everyone has gotten over their caffeine addictions, switch to espresso.

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