регистрация / вход

How To Prepare For An Interview Essay

, Research Paper An interview is a formal consultation usually to evaluate qualifications of a prospective student or employee. No matter how well qualified you are for a job or how expressive you are about your strengths and experience, there is nothing that can replace preparation. The more you prepare up front, the more relaxed you will fill during the interview.

, Research Paper

An interview is a formal consultation usually to evaluate qualifications of a prospective student or employee. No matter how well qualified you are for a job or how expressive you are about your strengths and experience, there is nothing that can replace preparation. The more you prepare up front, the more relaxed you will fill during the interview. The more relaxed you feel, the better you will perform, and the better you perform, the more likely you will get the job. In this report I will tell how to make the best impression, know what to expect, and know what to do if things don’t go quite as you planned. The best way to prepare for a job interview is to think carefully about the job itself and to understand that job interviews have a dual purpose. The organization’s main objective is to find the best person available for the job. The applicants main objective is to find the job best suited to his or her goals and capabilities. Once an applicant gets his or her foot in the door, they will meet for an employment interview. An employment interview is a formal meeting in which employers and applicants ask questions and exchange information to learn more about eachother. Most organizations interview an applicant several times before extending a job offer. “Interviews are not about the best person for the job; interviews are about, and can only ever be about who appears to be the best person for the job” (Garside, 2) It’s perfectly normal to feel a little anxious before an interview. So much depends on it, and you don’t know quite what to expect. Don’t worry too much, preparation will help you perform well. To prepare for a job interview, do some basic research, think ahead about interview questions, build your confidence, practice your interview style, plan to look your best, and be ready when you arrive. Learning about the organization and the job is important. The applicant needs to research the products, processes and location of the company. You need to know the company’s reputation such as their strengths and weaknesses, financial history, major competitors, major changers due to technology, and its regulatory involvement. Most job interviews are essentially question – and – answer sessions. Questions and answers will consume the greatest part of the interview. During this part of the interview, the interviewer will ask you about your qualifications and discuss many of the points mentioned in your resume. You’ll also be asked whether you have any questions of your own. Try not to limit yourself to yes or no answers. Consider the direction of the discussion, and guide it where you wish with your responses. Paying attention when the interviewer speaks can be as important as giving good answers or asking good questions. Listening makes up about half the time you spend in an interview. Be alert to nonverbal communication. The interviewer’s facial expressions, eye movements, gestures, and posture may tell you the real meaning of what’s being said. You need to be prepared for the illegal questions also. Keep in mind that employers cannot legally discriminate against a job candidate on the basis of race, color, gender, age, marital status, religion, national origin, or disability. How you respond to illegal type of questions depends on how badly you want the job, how you feel about revealing the information asked for, what you think the interviewer will do with the information, and whether you want to work for a company that asks illegal questions. If you don’t want the job, you can tell the interviewer that you think a particular question is illegal. However, if you want the job, you can choose a more tactual approach. You might ask how the question relates to your qualifications for the job, explain that the information is personal, respond to what you think is the interviewer’s real concern, or answer both the question and the concern. The interviewee needs to be prepared for the standard interview questions, but he/she needs to be ready for the killer questions. The interviewer may ask questions such as: Tell me about yourself? What are your strengths and weaknesses? In what ways would you contribute to our organization? Oftentimes, you will be asked slightly tougher questions about your past employment experiences. Here are some sample questions: Give me an example of a project you worked on that didn’t turn out well? What is your energy level like? Describe a typical day? How do you handle stress? Whatever the question you need to be prepared. You need to get a clear idea in your head of what answer you would give to each of these questions. Confidence plays a major role in interviews. You don’t want to be boastful, but you don’t want to show lack of confidence either. One way to overcome shyness is to know that there is no question you can’t answer, know you are well suited for the position, and know you would be an asset to the company. Once you have practiced asking and answering questions you are on your way to employment. Remember that all the other candidates for the job are probably just as nervous as you are. Also remember the interviewer is human and may be nervous. The interviewee not only needs confidence, but also has to have good manners and style. You need to speak in your natural tone and try to vary the pitch rate, and volume of our voice to express enthusiasm and energy. The interviewee needs to practice a mock interview session because this will help he/she eliminate their faults. ” Remember to maintain eye contact, smile frequently, sit I an attentive position, and use frequent hand gestures. These nonverbal signs convince the interviewer that you are alert, dependable, confident, responsible, and energetic.” (Bovee, 407) You can impress an interviewer just by the way you look. You need to dress conservatively and wear businesslike clothing, preferably in dark solid colors. You need to never smoke in an interview, even if the interviewer offers. You need to also make sure your hair is combed, clothes clean and unwrinkled, fresh breath, and no chewing gum during the interview. One of the factors in preparing for an interview is to make sure you know exactly where the company is located. Once you know all the directions, you need to arrive early. Punctuality is a key element in the business world. Once you have arrived, you need to be polite to everyone you meet there. Remember they all count. Make sure you bring extra resumes, notepad, and pen. Be sure you know how to pronounce your interviewers name correctly. There is nothing worse than pronouncing someone’s name incorrectly. Assume all questions are asked for a good reason and answer accordingly. You need to fell free to ask for clarification before answering a question. Remember to answer all questions honestly, but in the best, most positive light. If any questions are asked about past employers, make sure you say good things. Never bad mouth old employers. The end of the interview is as important as any other part of the interview. You can detect that the interviewer is concluding up the session if he/she asks if you have any questions, sum up the discussion, change position, or indicate with a gesture that the interview is over. When you get the signal, respond accordingly, but don’t rush. Be sure to thank the interview his convenience of letting you take the opportunity to further your interest in his/her company. As soon as you leave the interview, make sure to write down some notes. If you don’t make the notes quickly and promptly then you will forget everything that was important in the interview. You need to also send a thank-you letter within two days after the interview. This needs to take place even if you don’t think you have a chance at the job. Within the thank-you letter be sure to state the job you were applying for and politely ask for a decision. If the interviewer told you before the interview was over that you were unqualified for the job, you need to still send a thank-you letter. This shows respect and dignity, in which you may be thought of for other positions within the company. When writing a thank-you letter make sure you get your facts straight, such as be sure to spell names and titles correctly. Use your instincts on how the interview went and choose the proper tone for writing the letter. In some shape or form, you need to individualize your thank-you letter. Never write over a page in length, keep it short. When you are preparing for an interview, always have a positive attitude. There is nothing that can substitute a positive attitude. Agreeably, mental readiness and a positive attitude can go hand-in-hand. These two factors will keep the jitterbugs away. Even if this interview could be possibly the biggest day of your life, you still need to focus on your wants and needs and also know the difference between the two. If all else fails, remember the: RESEARCH REHEARSE RELAX An interview is a formal consultation usually to evaluate qualifications of a prospective student or employee. No matter how well qualified you are for a job or how expressive you are about your strengths and experience, there is nothing that can replace preparation. The more you prepare up front, the more relaxed you will fill during the interview. The more relaxed you feel, the better you will perform, and the better you perform, the more likely you will get the job. In this report I will tell how to make the best impression, know what to expect, and know what to do if things don’t go quite as you planned. The best way to prepare for a job interview is to think carefully about the job itself and to understand that job interviews have a dual purpose. The organization’s main objective is to find the best person available for the job. The applicants main objective is to find the job best suited to his or her goals and capabilities. Once an applicant gets his or her foot in the door, they will meet for an employment interview. An employment interview is a formal meeting in which employers and applicants ask questions and exchange information to learn more about eachother. Most organizations interview an applicant several times before extending a job offer. “Interviews are not about the best person for the job; interviews are about, and can only ever be about who appears to be the best person for the job” (Garside, 2) It’s perfectly normal to feel a little anxious before an interview. So much depends on it, and you don’t know quite what to expect. Don’t worry too much, preparation will help you perform well. To prepare for a job interview, do some basic research, think ahead about interview questions, build your confidence, practice your interview style, plan to look your best, and be ready when you arrive. Learning about the organization and the job is important. The applicant needs to research the products, processes and location of the company. You need to know the company’s reputation such as their strengths and weaknesses, financial history, major competitors, major changers due to technology, and its regulatory involvement. Most job interviews are essentially question – and – answer sessions. Questions and answers will consume the greatest part of the interview. During this part of the interview, the interviewer will ask you about your qualifications and discuss many of the points mentioned in your resume. You’ll also be asked whether you have any questions of your own. Try not to limit yourself to yes or no answers. Consider the direction of the discussion, and guide it where you wish with your responses. Paying attention when the interviewer speaks can be as important as giving good answers or asking good questions. Listening makes up about half the time you spend in an interview. Be alert to nonverbal communication. The interviewer’s facial expressions, eye movements, gestures, and posture may tell you the real meaning of what’s being said. You need to be prepared for the illegal questions also. Keep in mind that employers cannot legally discriminate against a job candidate on the basis of race, color, gender, age, marital status, religion, national origin, or disability. How you respond to illegal type of questions depends on how badly you want the job, how you feel about revealing the information asked for, what you think the interviewer will do with the information, and whether you want to work for a company that asks illegal questions. If you don’t want the job, you can tell the interviewer that you think a particular question is illegal. However, if you want the job, you can choose a more tactual approach. You might ask how the question relates to your qualifications for the job, explain that the information is personal, respond to what you think is the interviewer’s real concern, or answer both the question and the concern. The interviewee needs to be prepared for the standard interview questions, but he/she needs to be ready for the killer questions. The interviewer may ask questions such as: Tell me about yourself? What are your strengths and weaknesses? In what ways would you contribute to our organization? Oftentimes, you will be asked slightly tougher questions about your past employment experiences. Here are some sample questions: Give me an example of a project you worked on that didn’t turn out well? What is your energy level like? Describe a typical day? How do you handle stress? Whatever the question you need to be prepared. You need to get a clear idea in your head of what answer you would give to each of these questions. Confidence plays a major role in interviews. You don’t want to be boastful, but you don’t want to show lack of confidence either. One way to overcome shyness is to know that there is no question you can’t answer, know you are well suited for the position, and know you would be an asset to the company. Once you have practiced asking and answering questions you are on your way to employment. Remember that all the other candidates for the job are probably just as nervous as you are. Also remember the interviewer is human and may be nervous. The interviewee not only needs confidence, but also has to have good manners and style. You need to speak in your natural tone and try to vary the pitch rate, and volume of our voice to express enthusiasm and energy. The interviewee needs to practice a mock interview session because this will help he/she eliminate their faults. ” Remember to maintain eye contact, smile frequently, sit I an attentive position, and use frequent hand gestures. These nonverbal signs convince the interviewer that you are alert, dependable, confident, responsible, and energetic.” (Bovee, 407) You can impress an interviewer just by the way you look. You need to dress conservatively and wear businesslike clothing, preferably in dark solid colors. You need to never smoke in an interview, even if the interviewer offers. You need to also make sure your hair is combed, clothes clean and unwrinkled, fresh breath, and no chewing gum during the interview.

One of the factors in preparing for an interview is to make sure you know exactly where the company is located. Once you know all the directions, you need to arrive early. Punctuality is a key element in the business world. Once you have arrived, you need to be polite to everyone you meet there. Remember they all count. Make sure you bring extra resumes, notepad, and pen. Be sure you know how to pronounce your interviewers name correctly. There is nothing worse than pronouncing someone’s name incorrectly. Assume all questions are asked for a good reason and answer accordingly. You need to fell free to ask for clarification before answering a question. Remember to answer all questions honestly, but in the best, most positive light. If any questions are asked about past employers, make sure you say good things. Never bad mouth old employers. The end of the interview is as important as any other part of the interview. You can detect that the interviewer is concluding up the session if he/she asks if you have any questions, sum up the discussion, change position, or indicate with a gesture that the interview is over. When you get the signal, respond accordingly, but don’t rush. Be sure to thank the interview his convenience of letting you take the opportunity to further your interest in his/her company. As soon as you leave the interview, make sure to write down some notes. If you don’t make the notes quickly and promptly then you will forget everything that was important in the interview. You need to also send a thank-you letter within two days after the interview. This needs to take place even if you don’t think you have a chance at the job. Within the thank-you letter be sure to state the job you were applying for and politely ask for a decision. If the interviewer told you before the interview was over that you were unqualified for the job, you need to still send a thank-you letter. This shows respect and dignity, in which you may be thought of for other positions within the company. When writing a thank-you letter make sure you get your facts straight, such as be sure to spell names and titles correctly. Use your instincts on how the interview went and choose the proper tone for writing the letter. In some shape or form, you need to individualize your thank-you letter. Never write over a page in length, keep it short. When you are preparing for an interview, always have a positive attitude. There is nothing that can substitute a positive attitude. Agreeably, mental readiness and a positive attitude can go hand-in-hand. These two factors will keep the jitterbugs away. Even if this interview could be possibly the biggest day of your life, you still need to focus on your wants and needs and also know the difference between the two. If all else fails, remember the: RESEARCH REHEARSE RELAX An interview is a formal consultation usually to evaluate qualifications of a prospective student or employee. No matter how well qualified you are for a job or how expressive you are about your strengths and experience, there is nothing that can replace preparation. The more you prepare up front, the more relaxed you will fill during the interview. The more relaxed you feel, the better you will perform, and the better you perform, the more likely you will get the job. In this report I will tell how to make the best impression, know what to expect, and know what to do if things don’t go quite as you planned. The best way to prepare for a job interview is to think carefully about the job itself and to understand that job interviews have a dual purpose. The organization’s main objective is to find the best person available for the job. The applicants main objective is to find the job best suited to his or her goals and capabilities. Once an applicant gets his or her foot in the door, they will meet for an employment interview. An employment interview is a formal meeting in which employers and applicants ask questions and exchange information to learn more about eachother. Most organizations interview an applicant several times before extending a job offer. “Interviews are not about the best person for the job; interviews are about, and can only ever be about who appears to be the best person for the job” (Garside, 2) It’s perfectly normal to feel a little anxious before an interview. So much depends on it, and you don’t know quite what to expect. Don’t worry too much, preparation will help you perform well. To prepare for a job interview, do some basic research, think ahead about interview questions, build your confidence, practice your interview style, plan to look your best, and be ready when you arrive. Learning about the organization and the job is important. The applicant needs to research the products, processes and location of the company. You need to know the company’s reputation such as their strengths and weaknesses, financial history, major competitors, major changers due to technology, and its regulatory involvement. Most job interviews are essentially question – and – answer sessions. Questions and answers will consume the greatest part of the interview. During this part of the interview, the interviewer will ask you about your qualifications and discuss many of the points mentioned in your resume. You’ll also be asked whether you have any questions of your own. Try not to limit yourself to yes or no answers. Consider the direction of the discussion, and guide it where you wish with your responses. Paying attention when the interviewer speaks can be as important as giving good answers or asking good questions. Listening makes up about half the time you spend in an interview. Be alert to nonverbal communication. The interviewer’s facial expressions, eye movements, gestures, and posture may tell you the real meaning of what’s being said. You need to be prepared for the illegal questions also. Keep in mind that employers cannot legally discriminate against a job candidate on the basis of race, color, gender, age, marital status, religion, national origin, or disability. How you respond to illegal type of questions depends on how badly you want the job, how you feel about revealing the information asked for, what you think the interviewer will do with the information, and whether you want to work for a company that asks illegal questions. If you don’t want the job, you can tell the interviewer that you think a particular question is illegal. However, if you want the job, you can choose a more tactual approach. You might ask how the question relates to your qualifications for the job, explain that the information is personal, respond to what you think is the interviewer’s real concern, or answer both the question and the concern. The interviewee needs to be prepared for the standard interview questions, but he/she needs to be ready for the killer questions. The interviewer may ask questions such as: Tell me about yourself? What are your strengths and weaknesses? In what ways would you contribute to our organization? Oftentimes, you will be asked slightly tougher questions about your past employment experiences. Here are some sample questions: Give me an example of a project you worked on that didn’t turn out well? What is your energy level like? Describe a typical day? How do you handle stress? Whatever the question you need to be prepared. You need to get a clear idea in your head of what answer you would give to each of these questions. Confidence plays a major role in interviews. You don’t want to be boastful, but you don’t want to show lack of confidence either. One way to overcome shyness is to know that there is no question you can’t answer, know you are well suited for the position, and know you would be an asset to the company. Once you have practiced asking and answering questions you are on your way to employment. Remember that all the other candidates for the job are probably just as nervous as you are. Also remember the interviewer is human and may be nervous. The interviewee not only needs confidence, but also has to have good manners and style. You need to speak in your natural tone and try to vary the pitch rate, and volume of our voice to express enthusiasm and energy. The interviewee needs to practice a mock interview session because this will help he/she eliminate their faults. ” Remember to maintain eye contact, smile frequently, sit I an attentive position, and use frequent hand gestures. These nonverbal signs convince the interviewer that you are alert, dependable, confident, responsible, and energetic.” (Bovee, 407) You can impress an interviewer just by the way you look. You need to dress conservatively and wear businesslike clothing, preferably in dark solid colors. You need to never smoke in an interview, even if the interviewer offers. You need to also make sure your hair is combed, clothes clean and unwrinkled, fresh breath, and no chewing gum during the interview. One of the factors in preparing for an interview is to make sure you know exactly where the company is located. Once you know all the directions, you need to arrive early. Punctuality is a key element in the business world. Once you have arrived, you need to be polite to everyone you meet there. Remember they all count. Make sure you bring extra resumes, notepad, and pen. Be sure you know how to pronounce your interviewers name correctly. There is nothing worse than pronouncing someone’s name incorrectly. Assume all questions are asked for a good reason and answer accordingly. You need to fell free to ask for clarification before answering a question. Remember to answer all questions honestly, but in the best, most positive light. If any questions are asked about past employers, make sure you say good things. Never bad mouth old employers. The end of the interview is as important as any other part of the interview. You can detect that the interviewer is concluding up the session if he/she asks if you have any questions, sum up the discussion, change position, or indicate with a gesture that the interview is over. When you get the signal, respond accordingly, but don’t rush. Be sure to thank the interview his convenience of letting you take the opportunity to further your interest in his/her company. As soon as you leave the interview, make sure to write down some notes. If you don’t make the notes quickly and promptly then you will forget everything that was important in the interview. You need to also send a thank-you letter within two days after the interview. This needs to take place even if you don’t think you have a chance at the job. Within the thank-you letter be sure to state the job you were applying for and politely ask for a decision. If the interviewer told you before the interview was over that you were unqualified for the job, you need to still send a thank-you letter. This shows respect and dignity, in which you may be thought of for other positions within the company. When writing a thank-you letter make sure you get your facts straight, such as be sure to spell names and titles correctly. Use your instincts on how the interview went and choose the proper tone for writing the letter. In some shape or form, you need to individualize your thank-you letter. Never write over a page in length, keep it short. When you are preparing for an interview, always have a positive attitude. There is nothing that can substitute a positive attitude. Agreeably, mental readiness and a positive attitude can go hand-in-hand. These two factors will keep the jitterbugs away. Even if this interview could be possibly the biggest day of your life, you still need to focus on your wants and needs and also know the difference between the two. If all else fails, remember the: RESEARCH REHEARSE RELAX An interview is a formal consultation usually to evaluate qualifications of a prospective student or employee. No matter how well qualified you are for a job or how expressive you are about your strengths and experience, there is nothing that can replace preparation. The more you prepare up front, the more relaxed you will fill during the interview. The more relaxed you feel, the better you will perform, and the better you perform, the more likely you will get the job. In this report I will tell how to make the best impression, know what to expect, and know what to do if things don’t go quite as you planned. The best way to prepare for a job interview is to think carefully about the job itself and to understand that job interviews have a dual purpose. The organization’s main objective is to find the best person available for the job. The applicants main objective is to find the job best suited to his or her goals and capabilities. Once an applicant gets his or her foot in the door, they will meet for an employment interview. An employment interview is a formal meeting in which employers and applicants ask questions and exchange information to learn more about eachother. Most organizations interview an applicant several times before extending a job offer. “Interviews are not about the best person for the job; interviews are about, and can only ever be about who appears to be the best person for the job” (Garside, 2) It’s perfectly normal to feel a little anxious before an interview. So much depends on it, and you don’t know quite what to expect. Don’t worry too much, preparation will help you perform well. To prepare for a job interview, do some basic research, think ahead about interview questions, build your confidence, practice your interview style, plan to look your best, and be ready when you arrive. Learning about the organization and the job is important. The applicant needs to research the products, processes and location of the company. You need to know the company’s reputation such as their strengths and weaknesses, financial history, major competitors, major changers due to technology, and its regulatory involvement. Most job interviews are essentially question – and – answer sessions. Questions and answers will consume the greatest part of the interview. During this part of the interview, the interviewer will ask you about your qualifications and discuss many of the points mentioned in your resume. You’ll also be asked

ОТКРЫТЬ САМ ДОКУМЕНТ В НОВОМ ОКНЕ

Комментариев на модерации: 1.

ДОБАВИТЬ КОММЕНТАРИЙ [можно без регистрации]

Ваше имя:

Комментарий