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Frankenstein 8 Essay Research Paper

Frankenstein 8 Essay, Research Paper “Be gone!” the words of disgust spoken by Victor Frankenstein in response to his Creature s desire for a companion. It is found that Victor, Walton, and the Creature each desire a companion to either fall back on during hard times, to console with, or to learn from. Throughout the novel, it is found that Victor depends heavily on friendship when tragedy occurs to keep him from going insane.

Frankenstein 8 Essay, Research Paper

“Be gone!” the words of disgust spoken by Victor Frankenstein in response to his Creature s desire for a companion. It is found that Victor, Walton, and the Creature each desire a companion to either fall back on during hard times, to console with, or to learn from. Throughout the novel, it is found that Victor depends heavily on friendship when tragedy occurs to keep him from going insane. Walton desires the companionship of a man to have someone who will give him a opinion on things. The sole purpose of the Creature is to find a companion to learn from and not be a total outcast to society. At the times when the characters are alone and in need of companionship, they feel depressed, confused, and angry. They do not think clearly, and, consequently, they make wrong decisions. They seek refuge in nature, and try to use its beauty to find answers and to fill the void of friendship they experienced. Yet, none of the characters ever overcomes their bouts with loneliness because they never find true comfort in nature. All the characters seem to be looking for friendship and when that is not found they all resort to attempt to find peace with nature. Together, all three men can love humanity when with companions but can also be crazy when isolated.

Victor Frankenstein s early life was filled with love and nurturing from his parents, his beautiful and adored companion Elizabeth, and his best friend Henry Clerval. Whenever Victor suffers tragedy, he looks to the close comfort of his friends to raise his spirits. Victor Frankenstein becomes so wrapped up in his curiosity of creation, he ignores the outside world. He wanted companionship by taking nature in his hands and creating someone to honor him for giving them life, but it backfired and he sealed his fate to the wrath of his Creature. He becomes mad and sickened after the Creature s awakening. When Frankenstein ventures into the mountains of his homeland, he tries to recollect the pleasant thoughts of his home and family through Clerval. He found that he could fall back on Clerval to forget the pain. After the loss of Clerval and his family members Victor has trouble controlling his emotions. Victor Frankenstein struggles for control over one aspect of nature and disastrously, through the Creature, nature controls him to a much greater degree.

Frankenstein s Creature endures loneliness, as he is alienated by society because of his physical appearance as a monster. In addition, his “father,” Frankenstein does not nurture him, so he is alone with no direction or knowledge. Nature provides for the basic needs of the Creature, and the Creature enters a cooperative interaction with nature. The Creature strives to make a friend and have some reason to love humanity. Since no one else is there for him, and nature provides him with food, shelter, and light, the Creature seems to find consolation in nature. Yet, even that turns sour, when the Creature desires more than just the basic needs, but friendship as well. He pursues to learn and gain wisdom when he discovers the De Lacey s. He learns many things about human society. The Creature observes how the De Lacey s are so happy together and he wants nothing more than to join them. By learning from them, he values them highly. The Creature begins to feel as their protector and wants to see them happy. When he brings them wood and harvests their crop he does it so he can share the happiness with the De Lacey s. He finds that by having someone to interact with, he can be just as cheerful as the DeLacey s. After the Creature s continual efforts to find companionship with the cottagers the violent encounter occurred with Felix, the Creature then flees into the woods. Nature no longer provides the Creature with the comfort as it once did. Therefore, the Creature does not overcome his loneliness through nature, and asks his creator to give him a mate. Victor shows a lack of compassion for his creation after the Creature requested a female companion. Victor proves once and for all that his true feelings for the Creature are those of unjustified hatred. He has no basis for these feelings other than that of his undying prejudice against the Creature. As a result of the opposing emotions illustrated by maker and creation, both are in constant conflict with each other and therefore can never live in harmony.

Robert Walton shares the same lonesome feelings that Frankenstein and his Creature suffer. Walton is a man with a romantic quest, with no friend to share in his ups and downs. In a letter to his sister, he says, “But I have one want which I have never yet been able to satisfy; and the absence of which I now feel as a most severe evil. I have no friend” (page 4). Since Walton cannot find anyone to fill his need for a friend, he instead quenches his strong thirst for knowledge, and journeys through nature to find a Northwest Passage. He tries to find comfort through nature, yet it is never enough. Once Walton meets Frankenstein and finds a true friend in him, he begins to “love him as a brother,” he fills Walton with happiness, courage, and determination to achieve his quest. However, when Frankenstein starts to reach the end of his life, Walton begins to despair and feel upset with the loss of the one he values and admires so. When he must face his sailors mutiny against the trip through the north, Frankenstein stands by him. Yet, when Frankenstein s life slowly slips away, Walton has no choice than to give into his crew s demands to return to England. With the absence of Walton s companion, nature is no longer sufficient to comfort him. Walton regards Victor as an intelligent man and discovers that he has obtained his desire for the want of a friend. Frankenstein is the strength behind Walton.

Each character in Mary Shelley s “Frankenstein,” has their own unique perspective on how they value friendship. Victor Frankenstein prospers from the ability to rely on his friends during tragic times. . Although people sometimes think that nonliving things, such as nature, can make up for the desires they have in their own lives, they could never be truly satisfied with just that. Walton needs a companion that he can express his feelings to and relate to on many subjects. The Creature greatly appreciates the ability to learn from a friend and wants someone so he can be freed from isolation. Humans are very dependent on anyone or anything that brings them comfort. They need to feel companionship and love from a friend to keep them strong, happy, and on the right path. “Frankenstein,” directly shows how respect and love of nature is important, yet the presence of companionship overpowers all.

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